The rottweiler

  • I grabbed the following off the internet a few years ago. I like it because it echos my own thoughts. While in every breed description there's a degree of idealism and wishful thinking, these words ring true to me because I've known one such dog. My own dog which is the second best rott I've ever known comes close too. His problem is too much unchecked drive due to having been raised to 4 years of age by someone who didn't give him direction. My experience has been that the caveat to the following description is that dogs do not become that way on their own, they need to be guided and controlled. That however is a reality of living in a culture where too many things are taboo for a dog. I believe it's possible that when living in an environment where it's more free to express its instincts and personality and consequently have more opportunities to learn from mistakes, the dog will appear to have acquired a balance naturally/due to it's inherent nature. Maybe the dogs of the past were such dogs.


    Dan

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    To appreciate the breed you need to know something of it´s orgin. It is useful to have some idea of how the dog developed and how its instincts and capacities were modified and adapted to carry out its working role. Below is the very first dog that impressed me in the history and some comments that old breeders have told.


    I remember my very first rottweiler book of my own and the picture of Hackel v Köhlerwald. Hackel was bred by Weber and owned by Jakob Köpf, Head breeding supervisor of the ADRK, being also one of the most successful and knowledgeable breeders of all time. His comments about Hackel are very revealing:




     
     "I must mention one dog in particular, Hackel. he was the best rottweiler that I have ever known. Unfortunately I was not his breeder, but i did have the luck to own him for ten years. He was smarter than any dog that I ever had. he´s nerves was steel, he had his total freedom, did everything right, was frightened by nothing and yet was very goodnatured so that everyone could touch him. If nessessary he attacked immediately, but never seriosly hurt anyone. he sired the greatest number of Rottweilers and did so the breed great benefit. My wish: another Hackel to my life. He does not have to be handsome as as the Köhlerwald dogs, but he would have to bring a rottweiler`s character like Hackel`s. It is possible that other work breeds are better in this or that characterictic, but in stediness, courage and aggressiveness, none is superior to the ROTTWEILER!." ( In June 1957 )


    The great triple Sieger SchH2 Hackel v Köhlerwald passed on both looks and Character to his progeny, making him, possibly the breeds greatest sire. ( courtesy M Bruns.from he book of rottweilers ) Hackel sired eighty-two litters with 375 puppies being registered. He produced over 100 champions and the greatest of dog graded "excellent" both in work and show.

  • Do you mean that you have just known two Rotts that fit the standard ? Standard is an opposite concept than ideal, ideal is (metaphysical) an trasscendental, not tangible essence. Standard is a minimum or maximum set of characteristics. Malinois in the other hand, as skinny as they are, fit that standard better than any other dog that i ´ve known.

    "Every dog, we are told, has his day, unless there are more dogs than days." B.M.

  • For exceptional do you mean beyond the standard? I have seen a lot of abandoned Rotts, that their owners gave up due to " flaws of character" I really think that those so called "flaws" come from the owner part. That´s why I am asking, I can´t stand so many Rott detractors.

    "Every dog, we are told, has his day, unless there are more dogs than days." B.M.

  • My belief is that the standard is partly a wishful thinking attempt at describing the exceptional. Exceptional dogs are rare in any field be it hunting or police work, you can come across one or two in your lifetime. A higher number of dogs can simply do the job, but an exceptional dog goes one step further. He could bring extra talents that made working with him or owning him a real treat, such as intelligence and an intuitive understanding of the task at hand, or being a very good family dog.


    Imagine knowing such an exceptional dog and that he just happened to have a white patch on his chest. The dog is getting on in years and you realize that the time is nearing when you'll need to replace him. So you breed him to a nice bitch and she has eight puppies. All puppies are showing the normal behavior and drive, indications that tell you about their suitability for the task you intended them for. But only one of these eight puppies has a white patch on his chest just like daddy, your beloved dog. Which puppy would you select for yourself? Normal human thinking is "I'll take the one that looks like daddy, he may turn out the same". A breed standard usually dictates the dog's structure as far as height, color, earset, eye color, tail carriage etc. Some of this is relevant to the dogs work, other times it's just arbitrary and IMO goes back to what I just described. Breed temperament standard is even more loose or imaginative.


    It has been my experience, and I've owned at least 20 rottweilers plus the ones I knew and trained, that there has been such a variation in type and temperament that other than being black and tan they could've been different breeds. I myself don't care about the black and tan coat and believe that if it's not directly linked to some temperament traits, and it will help the dog cope with hot climate then allow a fawn dog with a black mask in the standard. But I am weary that losing the black & tan coat will also eliminate some temperament traits that IMO define the rottweiler.

  • Standard= gets the job done= Fills the zootechnic function of the breed
    Exceptional= Bunde Sieger = The best dog from a generation that goes beyond the standard, but stills is the one others are to be judge from.

    "Every dog, we are told, has his day, unless there are more dogs than days." B.M.

  • A Bundesieger winner does not equal exceptional to me simply because it's someone's opinion who I do not know. There's a lot of money and politics in that game today. The paragraph I quoted in the first post is also from a person I didn't know. But the words ring true to me based on my experiences, and I haven't heard anyone else describe the rottweiler like that. So I feel a kinship with the author and choose to believe his opinion.

  • i have done some reading on the rott, but have not come across the breeds that went into making it, to me it resembles a american bull dog and a doberman (i know doberman is a much younger breed), luckily my two favorite breeds, making the rott my a very special breed to me


    so wondering if anyone has any clue to what this breed was originally made up of


    In life the firmest friend,
    The first to welcome, foremost to defend,
    Whose honest heart is still his master's own
    Who labors, fights, lives, breathes for him alone.
    -Lord Byron

  • i have done some reading on the rott, but have not come across the breeds that went into making it, to me it resembles a american bull dog and a doberman (i know doberman is a much younger breed), luckily my two favorite breeds, making the rott my a very special breed to me


    so wondering if anyone has any clue to what this breed was originally made up of


    just saw this on wika:The principal ancestors of the first Rottweilers during this time was supposed to be the Roman droving dog, local dogs the army met on its travels, and dogs with molosser appearance coming from England and The Netherlands.


    i wonder what breed these "dogs with molosser appearance" where?


    In life the firmest friend,
    The first to welcome, foremost to defend,
    Whose honest heart is still his master's own
    Who labors, fights, lives, breathes for him alone.
    -Lord Byron

  • Go to Paw village http://pawvillage.com/pedigree/dynprofile.asp?ID=YHFGKQU1RM in this case the search starts with a rottweiler. Start clicking on the names of the sire or dam going back in time all the way back to the early 1900's. The photos of the dogs get more scarce the further back you go but you'll find some. You can also start over with a dog from different lines. You will see that the old rotts sometimes looked nothing like the typey rottweiler we've come to expect today. I believe they had the temperament though.



    A rottweiler is dog combining the trainability and control of a herder with the power of a molosser. It only makes sense that both kinds of dogs played a role in its makeup.

  • Go to Paw village http://pawvillage.com/pedigree/dynprofile.asp?ID=YHFGKQU1RM in this case the search starts with a rottweiler. Start clicking on the names of the sire or dam going back in time all the way back to the early 1900's. The photos of the dogs get more scarce the further back you go but you'll find some. You can also start over with a dog from different lines. You will see that the old rotts sometimes looked nothing like the typey rottweiler we've come to expect today. I believe they had the temperament though.



    A rottweiler is dog combining the trainability and control of a herder with the power of a molosser. It only makes sense that both kinds of dogs played a role in its makeup.


    wow so interesting i traced my puppies father back a hundred years, do you think they get the black and tan from the Beauceron?


    In life the firmest friend,
    The first to welcome, foremost to defend,
    Whose honest heart is still his master's own
    Who labors, fights, lives, breathes for him alone.
    -Lord Byron