Posts by David Frost

    I don't have a problem sharing stories, but you won't like what I have to say. First off, I think your trainer is way ahead of where he should be. That is not how you bring out the natural aggression in a dog. If he went into avoidance, there was much too much pressure to start in the beginning. I admit I don't know much about PPD, but I do know a lot about training dogs to be aggressive. It would have been two lessons for me, with that trainer. My first and my last.


    DFrost

    I do agree with Johan about the Mals. I think we'll see the average age of dogs creep upward a little if a unit has a fair share of mals. I've just not had enough of them, long enough to make that determination. I do have 2 of them that are currently 11, still working. One is starting to show some problems in the spine, more than the hips. The other looks like it might work till its' 20, ha ha. The problem with geriatric dogs, the look good today, but can go downhill very quickly.


    DFrost

    Thanks David. Put another way at what age would a green dog be deemed too old to be worth the investment of training it for police work? Lets say the dog has lots of potential.


    It is a matter of diminishing returns. You would have to weigh the the age of the dog at the beginning of training and the expected number of years you would anticipate the dog would be in service. For a PSD, (untrained dog) four years old would be my limit on the upside. Four years service, figuring the low end of the average, is minimally acceptable and you hope for eight years. Generally speaking though, 4 would be my limit.


    DFrost

    I have trained in martial arts for a number of years and hold a 3rd degree black belt in Tae Kwon-Do and know knife fighting, knife defense and other realistic defense techniques used by military. In my opinion a PPD or PSD would win hands down even if you have a knife isn't that what there trained for?


    Realistically and statistically, that just isn't accurate. While most occasions do result in the subject being captured and subsequetly subdued, there are those occasion the suspect is going to fight, regardless. When a person feels no pain due to drug ingestion, or that subject has a low tolerance to pain and high fight/flight instinct, the dog is often injured and sometimes killed. From my perspective, we have a saying in law enforcement; "Don't bring a knife to a gunfight". The dog, by himself, has no other options than engaging as trained, and remaining engaged until told to do otherwise. I do with to point out, my comments are strictly made in reference to PSD's. I don't have the knowledge base to comment on PPD's.


    DFrost

    In my experience with PSD's there is no set retirement age. Retirement is based solely on the dog's abilitly to perform the required tasks. As a managemen tool, most dogs are scheduled for replacement at 8 years old. I've had them work as long as 12. In my program, I do allow certain allowances for our aging workers (dogs) such as, I I don't care if they can't complete all the obstacles. If the handler elects to skip a couple of the more difficult ones, it's ok with me. As long as the dog can perform the basic functions, I'm good with it.


    DFros t

    I strongly disagree with the 99%. While the percentage may be high (maybe 60 or so) 99 is way off. Understanding that terminology is a primary catalyst for arguements in dog training, defense to me is more a fear response than anything else. As for police dogs, defense of the handler is practiced. It is a very controlled exercise. I've stated before, the only time the dog is permitted to "bite" is when commanded or the handler is attacked. The last thing a law enforcement canine needs to do is decide when he thinks a situation is dangerous or when he needs to react.


    DFrost

    I mention this only because the thread discussed the dog as "deadly force" and there was a mention of police service dogs. The courts, having opined in several cases, do NOT consider a PSD as deadly force. It's a distinction that we are law enforcement officers must be conscious of when we use force to make an apprehension.


    DFrost

    I don't know Mr. James, and while it's terrible his dog drowned, don't be too quick to judgement. First; Nashville recieved the most rain in a 24 hour period since they began keeping records. That means this surpasses the floods before the TVA built all the dams. Secondly, if you watched the news, there were interstates shut down for miles. In one unbelievable scene, a rescue boat was on I24 removing stranded drivers. These weren't drivers that drove around barricades. they were drivers that were trapped on the interstate when it was closed and the water came in behind them. There were places that flooded than have never been flooded before. Even the Opry Hotel had to evacuate guests by bus because the hotel was flooded. roads into the area were sealed by TDOT and police, no one was allowed in. I don't know where Mr. James lived, but I do know Nashville and the horrible ordeal that is unfolding still, as I post this. There, so far are 6 people dead because of this flood. While it's a shame that the dog drowned, let's be a little understanding that he may have done all he could do. Keep in perspective the loss of human life as well. I seriously doubt it was just negligence that caused that dog to drown.


    DFrost

    As odd as it may seem, dogs can get a yeast infection between the toes. They can also get a fungus. You might try some antibiotic cream or anti fungal treatment and see if that helps.


    DFrost